Addictions We Treat

Learn More About The Types of Addictions That Mountainview Recovery treats

Opioid Addiction

Opioid addiction is a chronic disease that can cause major health and, social problems. Opioids are a class of drugs that act in the nervous system to produce feelings of pleasure and pain relief. Some of the commonly prescribed opioids include: oxycodone, fentanyl, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, codeine, and morphine. Some other opioids, such as heroin, are illegal drugs of abuse.

Alcohol Addiction

Alcohol addiction, also known as alcoholism, is a disease that affects people from all walks of life. Alcohol addiction can be difficult to recognize. Unlike cocaine or heroin, alcohol is widely available and accepted in many cultures. It’s often at the center of social situations and closely linked to celebrations and enjoyment. Drinking is a part of life for many people. When is it common in society, it can be hard to tell the difference between someone who likes to have a few drinks now and then and someone with a real problem.

Heroin Addiction

Heroin is a highly addictive opioid drug, and its use has repercussions that extend far beyond the individual user. The medical and social consequences of drug use such as hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, fetal effects, crime, violence, and disruptions in family, workplace, and educational environments have a devastating impact on society and cost billions of dollars each year. Although heroin use in the general population is rather low, the numbers of people starting to use heroin have been steadily rising since 2007. This may be due in part to a shift from misuse of prescription pain relievers to heroin as a readily available, cheaper alternative and the misperception that pure heroin is safer than less pure forms because it does not need to be injected.

Cocaine Addiction

Cocaine is a white powdery substance that reacts with the body’s central nervous system, producing energy and euphoria. It is most commonly snorted, but can also be smoked or dissolved in water and injected. Cocaine is also referred to as coke, blow or powder. Although most people today recognize that cocaine is addictive, thousands are still drawn to it. As many as 1,800 Americans experiment with cocaine for the first time each day.

Fentanyl Addiction

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a Schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain or to manage pain after surgery. It is also sometimes used to treat patients with chronic pain who are physically tolerant to other opioids. Synthetic opioids, including fentanyl, are now the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths in the United States. In 2017, 59.8 percent of opioid-related deaths involved fentanyl compared to 14.3 percent in 2010.

Xanax Addiction

Xanax is a powerful benzodiazepine that is often prescribed to treat generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorders and insomnia. It is extremely addictive when used long-term. Xanax is the number one prescribed psychiatric medication in the United States. Seventy percent of teens with a Xanax addiction get the drug from their family’s medicine cabinet. Tolerance to Xanax develops quickly, requiring the user to take more of the drug to achieve the desired effects. Someone with a Xanax addiction may take up to 20 to 30 pills per day. If the user decides to stop taking Xanax, they may experience withdrawal effects, such as anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, and tremors.

Stimulant Addiction

Stimulants work by acting on the central nervous system to increase alertness and cognitive function. Stimulants can be prescription medications or illicit substances such as cocaine. Stimulants may be taken orally, snorted, or injected. This class of drugs is considered central nervous system stimulants. They work by increasing the amounts of the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine in the brain. The increase of these chemicals in the brain improves concentration and decreases the fatigue that are common with individuals who suffer from ADHD.

Methamphetamine Addiction

The misuse of methamphetamine, a potent and highly addictive stimulant, remains an extremely serious problem in the United States. In some areas of the country, it poses an even greater threat than opioids, and it is the drug that most contributes to violent crime. According to data from the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, over 14.7 million people (5.4 percent of the population) have tried methamphetamine at least once. NSDUH also reports that almost 1.6 million people used methamphetamine in the year leading up to the survey and it remains one of the most commonly misused stimulant drugs in the world.

Prescription Drug Addiction

Prescription drug abuse is when you take a medication for a reason other than why the doctor prescribed it. Experts estimate that more than 18 million people ages 12 and older have used prescription drugs for nonmedical reasons in the previous year. That’s more than 6% of the U.S. population. Abusing drugs, even prescription drugs, can change how your brain works. Most people start by choosing to take these medications. But over time, the changes in your brain affect your self-control and your ability to make good decisions. At the same time, you have intense urges to take more drugs.

Benzodiazepine Addiction

Benzodiazepines belong to the prescription sedative class of drugs. Although benzodiazepines have a calming effect, they are highly addictive, and a person who abuses them faces a host of symptoms. The drug class known as benzodiazepines is made up of prescription tranquilizers, also called sedatives or anxiolytics. They are prescribed for a host of conditions, such as anxiety disorder or panic disorder.

Ecstasy Addiction

Ecstasy is the street name for a version of MDMA, or 3,4 methylenedioxy-methamphetamine. It is an illegal, synthetic drug classified as a stimulant with potentially hallucinogenic properties. Molly is another name for MDMA. Both ecstasy and molly are made from MDMA, but ecstasy is used to describe a designer version in pill or tablet form, while molly is used for the white powder or crystal-like substance. Although molly is marketed as a pure form of MDMA, there is no way for users to know what’s in it. Both molly and ecstasy may be cut with other ingredients, including dangerous opiates like Fentanyl.

Kratom Addiction

Kratom abuse appears to be on the rise in the United States, as the Journal of Addictive Diseases reports on increased poison control center calls. In America, kratom is often marketed as a nutritional or dietary supplement. Negative reactions to the toxicity of the drug prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban its import in 2014. The Drug Enforcement Administration lists kratom as a “drug of concern” in the United States. Although the drug is not currently under federal control, it is still considered a possibly dangerous drug of abuse with the potential for dependence and addiction with prolonged and regular use.

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